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Matzo Ball Soup

This matzo ball soup, made with roasted chicken stock, carrots, celery, and matzo balls, is soothing and satisfying. An elegant addition to a Passover meal, or the perfect meal to gift a sick friend.

A white bowl filled with matzo ball soup and sprinkled with dill

This matzo ball soup is a like a comforting squeeze from your best friend. And it’s gonna rival traditional chicken soup in terms of your soul satisfaction given the richness of both the broth and the matzo balls. (Trust us. We’ve tried more matzo ball recipes than we care to count over the years. This is the only one we want to share with you. Folks are calling it the best matzo ball recipe they’ve ever experienced. We aren’t gonna disagree.) Whether offered as an elegant start to a Passover dinner party or just a soothing offering to a sick loved one, this soup will be happily slurped by all. If you prefer a brothier matzo ball soup experience, double the ingredients for the stock.–Angie Zoobkoff

Matzo Ball Soup

  • Quick Glance
  • 45 M
  • 3 H
  • Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds chicken bones
  • 2 small yellow onions
  • 3 carrots, left whole, plus 1 large carrot, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 celery stalks, plus 1 large celery stalk, thinly sliced
  • 6 cups water, or more as needed
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • Water
  • 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup matzo meal
  • 1 teaspoons onion powder
  • 1 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup rendered duck fat
  • 4 large eggs
  • 3 dill sprigs, chopped (about 1/8 cup)

Directions

  • 1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C).
  • 2. Before you begin, keep in mind, if you prefer a larger ratio of broth to matzo balls, double the chicken stock ingredients as the matzo balls soak up quite a lot of broth during cooking. Place the chicken bones on a rimmed baking sheet and roast, turning the bones halfway through cooking until the bones are golden brown, 40 to 45 minutes. Take care to not over-brown the bones as if they’re roasted too dark, your stock will turn bitter. Transfer the roasted bones to a large stockpot.
  • 3. Peel and halve the onions. Halve the whole carrots and celery stalks. Place the onions, carrots, and celery on the baking sheet the chicken bones were roasted on. Turn the vegetables to coat them in any fat that may be left on the baking sheet. Roast the vegetables for 15 minutes.
  • 4. Transfer the vegetables to the stockpot. Discard any drippings from the baking sheet but scrape any browned bits on the bottom of the pan into the stockpot containing the chicken bones. Add enough water so that all the bones and vegetables are submerged. You’ll want to use at least 6 cups and perhaps a couple cups more (1.4 l or more as needed).
  • 5. Trim the parsley stems from the leafy tops. Toss the stems in the stock and reserve the leaves for another purpose. Then add the black peppercorns and bay leaf to the stockpot. Bring to a gentle boil and then immediately turn down the heat and maintain a very low simmer until the stock has reduced by about a quarter, 30 to 45 minutes. Skim any foam or scum that forms on the surface of the stock as it simmers. Strain the stock into a clean, large stockpot and let it cool.
  • 6. While the stock is simmering, in a medium bowl, mix the matzo meal, onion powder, garlic powder, baking powder, and 1/2 teaspoon salt.
  • 7. In a small saucepan over low heat, melt the duck fat. (Alternatively, you can melt the duck fat in a microwave for 30 seconds.) In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs until combined, add the duck fat, and then whisk again.
  • 8. Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly until the mixture starts to thicken, 1 to 2 minutes. Cover the matzo ball mixture and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  • 9. Line a plate with wax or parchment paper. For large matzo balls, using a large spoon, scoop up a heaping amount of matzo mix (about 1 1/2 ounces or 42 grams), roll it into a ball, and place it on the plate. If the matzo balls stick to your hands, slick your hands with a little oil. You should end up with 6 to 8 matzo balls that are roughly the same size. Cover and refrigerate the matzo balls for 30 minutes. For smaller matzo balls, using a large spoon, scoop up a heaping amount of matzo mix (about 1/2 ounce or 15 grams), roll it into a ball, and place it on the plate. If the matzo balls stick to your hands, slick your hands with a little oil. You should end up with at least 18 matzo balls that are roughly the same size. Cover and refrigerate the matzo balls for 30 minutes.
  • 10. Bring the chicken stock to a simmer, season with salt, and add the matzo balls. Cover the pot and gently simmer (if it’s a rolling boil the matzo balls will fall apart) until the matzo balls have floated to the surface and are no longer egg-y in the center when you cut into one, 12 to 20 minutes, depending on the size. Don’t be surprised when the matzo balls double and perhaps triple in size as they soak up the broth. Gently stir in the sliced carrot and celery for the last 2 minutes of cooking.
  • 11. Place 1 large matzo ball or several smaller matzo balls n each bowl, ladle the chicken stock with carrot and celery over the top, and garnish with chopped dill.

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Matzo Ball Soup Recipe © 2017 Maya & Dean Jankelowitz. Photo © 2017 Henry Hargreaves. All rights reserved. All recipes and photos used with permission of the publisher.

#leitesculinaria on Instagram If you make this recipe, snap a photo and hashtag it #LeitesCulinaria. We’d love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Source | Foodbase.fun

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